Using Differentiated Instruction in Music Lesson Plans

Using Differentiated Instruction in Music Lesson Plans

Yesterday we talked about how incorporating differentiated instruction into your classroom can help meet student needs, empower them, and help them learn new skills faster. Today we’re going to look at five concrete ways you can get differentiated instruction into your lesson plans.

1. Try “Compacting” for Advanced Students

Strong players often get bored when it’s time to play another F major scale in half notes.

Differentiated Instruction in the Music Classroom

Differentiated Instruction in the Music Classroom

What if there was a way to make your classroom more efficient, save you time, and better communicate with your administrator all at once? Incorporating more differentiated instruction into your classroom takes some work, but the rewards are worth it.

“Differentiated instruction” refers to a teaching philosophy that gives different students different ways to learn the same material.

Free Lesson Plan for Your Music Sub

Free Lesson Plan for Your Music Sub

There are few things worse than unexpectedly needing a sub. It often begins with an unexpected circumstance that upsets your routine, followed by the realization of what the consequences will be for your classroom. You’ll miss rehearsal time with your students, your sub may or may not have music experience, and you might not even be able to contact them beforehand.

3 Ways to Include Your Method Book in Lesson Plans

3 Ways to Include Your Method Book in Lesson Plans

Yesterday, guest author Chris Bernotas talked about how to get the most from your method book. Choosing the right resource, understanding it, and making it a part of your ensemble goes a long way.  Making that method the focal point of your lesson plan, however, can be more difficult.

It’s easy to simply choose the next exercise in the book and make it the introduction to tomorrow’s rehearsal.

Getting the Most from Instrumental Method Books

Getting the Most from Instrumental Method Books

Using a first-year method book is an obvious one. It helps you manage the almost impossible task of starting tiny little people, with tiny little fingers and huge minds full of curiosity, on their very first steps of musical discovery. Videos of professionals showing some of the basic techniques can help you start them off right, and may remind us of tips we’ve forgotten over the years.

Replacing Learning Objectives with Learning Targets

Replacing Learning Objectives with Learning Targets

In the arts, a great work may begin without a clear end in mind—the splashes of color or the arcs of sound seemingly emerging from the artist or performer spontaneously. If it were only so with teaching students! While there may be artistic flair and creative gesture in conducting a school ensemble, our ultimate goal as teachers is to foster student learning.

Beginning Teachers and Micropolitical Issues at School

Beginning Teachers and Micropolitical Issues at School

I have spent most of my research career examining the challenges faced by beginning music teachers and exploring strategies such as mentoring and induction to support new teachers (Conway, 2015). The studies in this area are consistent in documenting common novice teacher challenges such as classroom management, scheduling and resources, and the feeling of being silenced.